Individuality and ASD: Please see my child, not the label of Autism

Back to school yesterday.  We were greeted by my son’s new teacher with “I have 25 years experience and a degree in special education – I know children like ….(your son)”.  I am sorry, but no, you do not know my child.  And, I would appreciate it if you actually took the time to do so rather than so readily assign him into a preconceived box.

My son is an individual.  He is a unique child, as all children are, particularly those on the Autism Spectrum. ASD, as the name suggests is a spectrum disorder, that is each child shows a variance in their expression of characteristics and traits. Paradoxically it seems, as soon as the child is known by an educator to has ASD they, more often than not, assign them to a stereotype of having certain characteristics and traits.

My son does not line objects up, nor does he continually meltdown at the slightest change in his routine.  He does have sensory requirements which may affect his learning though. Without seeing the individual child I worry that teachers, adults, limit the child’s full potential to learn and grow.  My son may not learn the way that others may  expect him to learn, or the way that the other 30 children in the classroom may learn, but trust me he is extremely smart and eager to learn and absorbs the world around him like no other child I have met.

Please see my child in front of you, not the label of Autism.

My son is a bright individual, not a generic label of Autism

My son is a bright individual, not a generic label of Autism

Advertisements
This entry was published on January 28, 2015 at 1:12 pm. It’s filed under Autism and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post.

One thought on “Individuality and ASD: Please see my child, not the label of Autism

  1. I have worked with autistic children for nearly 10 years and I have yet to meet two who are exactly alike. Everyone is an individual, especially those with autism x

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: